CHRONIC WOUND

Chandigarh cosmetic and Plastic Centre focuses on healing chronic, complex, and traumatic wounds.

Chronic wounds are those that do not progress through the usual stages of healing and usually have not healed or improved significantly within four weeks. This type of wound can include diabetic foot ulcers, venous leg ulcers, pressure ulcers, radiation tissue damage, osteomyelitis (chronic bone infection) or non-healing surgical wounds.

At Chandigarh Cosmetic and Plastic Centre, we are committed to using the most advanced tools and treatment approaches available today. Our average time to healing is well above the national average, meaning we get you back to your daily life sooner.

WE PROVIDE STATE-OF-THE-ART TREATMENTS, INCLUDING:

The cost of treatment varies based on a number of factors, including:

  • Non-invasive tests of circulation performed in clinic
  • Removal of dead or infected tissue
  • Advanced procedures to restore blood flow
  • Nutritional counseling and diabetes education
  • Antibiotic therapy
  • Specialized dressings
  • High tech skin substitute grafts
  • Epidermal skin grafting
  • Procedures and/or devices to relieve pressure on the wound
  • Compression therapy to reduce swelling
  • Protective footwear
  • Devices to reduce drainage and help increase the body’s natural healing ability
  • Specialized plastic surgery interventions including skin grafts and flaps

DIABETIC FOOT

diabetic foot ulcer is an open sore or wound that most commonly occurs on the bottom of the foot in approximately 15 percent of patients with diabetes. Of those who develop a foot ulcer, six percent will be hospitalized due to infection or other ulcer-related complication.

Anyone who has diabetes can develop a foot ulcer. Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanics and older men are more likely to develop ulcers. People who use insulin are at a higher risk of developing a foot ulcer, as are patients with diabetes-related kidney, eye, and heart disease. Being overweight and using alcohol and tobacco also play a role in the development of foot ulcers.

PLASTIC SURGERY SURGERY OPTION

A majority of noninfected foot ulcers are treated without surgery; however, when this fails, surgical management may be appropriate. Examples of surgical care to remove pressure on the affected area include shaving or excision of bone(s) and the correction of various deformities, such as hammertoes, bunions, or bony “bumps.”

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ABDOMINAL ETCHING

A skin graft is a piece of healthy skin removed from one area of your body to repair damaged or missing skin somewhere else on your body. This skin does not have its own source of blood flow.
A skin flap is healthy skin and tissue that is partly detached and moved to cover a nearby wound.

  • A skin flap may contain skin and fat, or skin, fat, and muscle.
  • Often, a skin flap is still attached to its original site at one end and remains connected to a blood vessel.
  • Sometimes a flap is moved to a new site and the blood vessel is surgically reconnected. This is called a free flap.

The area from where skin is taken is called the donor site. After surgery, you will have two wounds, the graft or flap itself and the donor site.
Learning how to care for skin flaps and grafts can help them heal more quickly and reduce scarring.

ALTERNATIVE NAMES

Autograft – self-care; Skin transplant – self-care; Split-skin graft – self-care; Full thickness skin graft – self-care; Partial-dermal skin graft – self-care; FTSG – self-care; STSG – self-care; Local flaps – self-care; Regional flaps – self-care; Distant flaps – self-care; Free flap – self-care; Skin autografting – self-care

WHY SKIN FLAP OR GRAFT SURGERY IS PERFORMED

Skin grafts are used to help more serious wounds heal, including:

  • Wounds that are too big to heal on their own
  • Burns
  • Skin loss from a serious skin infection
  • Surgery for skin cancer
  • Venous ulcers, pressure ulcers, or diabetic ulcers that do not heal
  • After mastectomy or amputation

Donor sites for grafts and flaps are chosen based on:

  • How closely the skin matches the area of the wound
  • How visible the scar will be from the donor site
  • How close the donor site is to the wound

Often the donor site may be more painful after surgery than the wound due to newly exposed nerve endings.

You will need to care for both the flap or graft site as well as the donor site. When you come home after surgery, you will have a dressing on your wounds. The dressing does several things, including

  • Protect your wound from germs and reduce the risk of infection
  • Protect the area as it heals
  • Soak up any fluids that leak from your wound

Often the donor site may be more painful after surgery than the wound due to newly exposed nerve endings.

To care for the graft or flap site:

  • You may need to rest for several days after surgery as your wound heals.
  • The type of dressing you have depends on the type of wound and where it is.
  • Keep the dressing and area around it clean and free from dirt or sweat.
  • Don’t let the dressing get wet.
  • Do not touch the dressing. Leave it in place for as long as your doctor recommends (about 4 to 7 days).
  • Take any medicines or pain relievers as directed.
  • If possible, try to elevate the wound so it’s above your heart. This helps reduce swelling. You may need to do this while sitting or lying down. You can use pillows to prop up the area.
  • If your doctor says it’s OK, you may use an ice pack on the bandage to help with swelling. Ask how often you should apply the ice pack. Be sure to keep the bandage dry.
  • Avoid any movement that might stretch or injure the flap or graft. Avoid hitting or bumping the area.
  • If you have a vacuum dressing, you may have a tube attached to the dressing. If the tube falls off, tell your doctor.
  • You will probably see your doctor to have your dressing changed in 4 to 7 days. You may need to have the dressing to your flap or graft site changed by your doctor a couple times over 2 to 3 weeks.
  • As the site heals, you may be able to care for it at home. Your doctor will show you how to care for your wound and apply dressings.
  • The site may become itchy as it heals

LOWER BODY LIFT

Dramatic weight loss, weight fluctuation or natural aging frequently results in sagging skin in areas below the waistline. Lower body lift surgery tightens and sculpts the buttocks, back of the thighs, outer thighs, inner thighs, hips and abdomen. Loose skin that looks aesthetically displeasing or causes mobility restrictions is removed. A lower body lift is appropriate if you are near your ideal weight and may precede or follow an upper body lift procedure. Every year, thousands of people undergo successful lower-body-lift surgery by Dr. Rahul Goyal.

  • If you have had dramatic weight loss due to bariatric surgery or dieting.
  • If you have relatively thin layers of fat below the skin in the hip, thigh, abdomen and buttock areas.
  • If overhanging skin in your lower body restricts your mobility and/or causes painful chafing, rashes or infection.
  • If you are distressed by sagging skin in your lower body.

After you’ve struggled to achieve a healthy weight or have undergone bariatric surgery, you may still feel frustrated by your appearance if you have excess skin along the lower abdomen, relaxed abdominal wall muscles and loose and wrinkled skin along the thighs and buttocks. A lower body lift, which leaves a circumferential scar hidden in the bikini line, can dramatically improve areas of sagging skin and/or cellulite below the waistline. The following are some common reasons why one may want to consider a lower body

  • Pregnancy and/or aging have left you with loose skin and cellulite below the waistline.
  • You have loose skin on your hips, the sides and fronts of your thighs, your inner thighs and your abdomen.
  • You have significant skin laxity, excess skin, ptosis (sagginess) of the buttocks and abdominal wall laxity.
  • The layers of fat below your loose skin are relatively thin.
  • You are willing to accept a thin circumferential scar around your waist.
  • You do not smoke. Smoking slows down the healing process and increases the risk of serious complications during and after surgery. If you smoke, you must quit at least six weeks before surgery.
  • Your weight has been stable for at least a year, with no further weight loss expected. For optimal results, body contouring should not be done for about two years after the start of any massive-weight-loss program. This time allows your skin to shrink as much as possible and your nutrition to be stabilized and optimized, factors that will aid in your recovery.
  • You are in overall good health without chronic medical conditions such as diabetes or heart disease. People in poor health are not good candidates for body contouring procedures. You must obtain clearance for plastic surgery from your primary care physician or from doctors treating you for medical conditions.